Daily Lessons

Daily Lessons

By My Mind My Power

Free learning experiences for secondary students designed by My Mind My Power to create thinking anywhere.

VIDEO TUTORIALS

Reading Analysis Activity Explanation

Patrick Zuniga explains the process for completing the reading analysis activities available on My Mind My Power's website (mymindmypower.com). These activities can be accessed on the Daily Lessons page found under the Service tab. Share your journey into reading by tagging @mymindmypower using the hashtags #keeplearing #mymindmypower #readingtime on social media.

Independent Reading Explanation

Patrick Zuniga explains the process of completing independent reading activities shared My Mind My Power 's website (mymindmypower.com). Whether you choose your own source or use the source shared by My Mind My Power, making time to read for 20 minutes begins the process. The shared articles and worksheets for independent reading can be accessed on the Daily Lessons page found under the Service tab on the My Mind My Power website . Share your journey into reading by tagging @mymindmypower on social media and use the hashtags #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Five-Point Scoring Explanation

Patrick Zuniga reviews five-point scoring considerations for daily learning experiences. Although the outlined process is specifically for Daily Work available at My Mind My Power (www.mymindmypower), students are encouraged to be mindful of their performance and engage in self-evaluation to identify strengths and areas for improvement when the complete learning experiences everyday. Share your journey into reading by tagging @mymindmypower on social media and use the hashtags #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

April 22: Listening Notes

April 22: Listening Notes

Note-Taking Form (Video + 20 min)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Take notes, 4. Complete the question on the bottom of the worksheet, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #mynotes

Imagine if you knew the secret of learning whatever you wanted to learn, whenever you wanted to learn it. Wouldn't that be great. Think about all the neat things you could learn about the world around you. First, you would simply ask a question inspired by something you saw or something you wanted to know more about. Next, you would investigate, explore, or experiment to find the answer. Finally, when you felt satisfied, you would have answered your own question. You would be able to say that you've learned something. There are rules that guide learning like those that encourage safety, respecting your learning environment, monitoring time management, and recognizing when you are off task. That's where teachers can help, but with some practice you can learn how to do those things too.

According to certain sources, Michael Jordan was nervous about the release of the "The Last Dance." Jordan expressed that he was afraid of being portrayed as a bad guy. In this clip, three sports commentators discuss Michael Jordan's reservations and concerns and why think that the documentary will not impact his legendary status.

Begin by downloading and printing or making your own version of the note-taking form below. As you watch the video, write down the important information you hear. Remember, you can stop the video any time you want, but practicing the skill of multi-tasking by listening and writing will probably help you later in life.


Video: Why Michael Jordan Fears the New Documentary

April 21: Independent Reading

April 21: Independent Reading

Art-Focus (50-60 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video and article, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Several studies suggest that reading 20 minutes a day will lead to interactions about 1.8 million words per year by the sixth grade and lead to higher literacy rates for those who make it a habit to read. Thinking about what you read is one way you can combine the power of your mind with the effort of your reading. This art-focused independent reading worksheet will help you think about what you read. This article is supported by a quick video that provides information about social distancing. 1. Watch the Video, 2. Read the Article, 3. Think while you read. 4. Complete the worksheet.

Video: The Last Dance Preview


Legend Profile: Michael Jordan


April 20: Independent Reading

April 20: Independent Reading

Vocabulary-Focus (50-60 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video and article, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Several studies suggest that reading 20 minutes a day will lead to interactions about 1.8 million words per year by the sixth grade and lead to higher literacy rates for those who make it a habit to read. Thinking about what you read is one way you can combine the power of your mind with the effort of your reading. This art-focused independent reading worksheet will help you think about what you read. This article is supported by a quick video that provides information about social distancing. 1. Watch the Video, 2. Read the Article, 3. Think while you read. 4. Complete the worksheet.

Video: Want to be Creative? Go for a Walk.


Article: Yes, It's (Probably) Safe To Go On Walks


April 16: Independent Reading

April 16: Independent Reading

Art-Focus (50-60 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video and article, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Several studies suggest that reading 20 minutes a day will lead to interactions about 1.8 million words per year by the sixth grade and lead to higher literacy rates for those who make it a habit to read. Thinking about what you read is one way you can combine the power of your mind with the effort of your reading. This art-focused independent reading worksheet will help you think about what you read. This article is supported by a quick video that provides information about social distancing. 1. Watch the Video, 2. Read the Article, 3. Think while you read. 4. Complete the worksheet.

Video: Why Laughing is Good For You


Article: Why Laughing is Good For You


April 15: Novel Reading

April 15: Novel Reading

Double Entry Journal (Until Finished)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Read your chapter(s), 3. Complete the worksheet using your chapter(s), 4. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Find a book that you get lost in. Books can inspire you to imagine, they can take your mind on literary journals around the world or to places that either do not exist or have yet to be discovered. Although you can use the linked double entry journal for any novel or chapter book that you choose, you are encouraged to discover books that are considered classics.

The Three Muskeeters is historical-fiction. This means the setting is an actual time and place in history featuring some well-known people from history as characters. Although The Three Muskeeters is remembered as an adventure novel, there are parts of it that make it seem as if it is a political novel as well. Do you think you have what it takes to become part of the Muskeeter corps? Follow d'Artagnan as he pursues his dreams of becoming a Muskeeter. Learn a bit more about the book by watching a trailer for the movie. If the preview makes you want to read the book, you can use the link to read a free version, you can check it out from your local library, or you can access it in some other way.


The Three Musketeers Trailer


The Three Musketeers Novel

April 14: Listening Notes

April 14: Listening Notes

Note-Taking Form (Video + 20 min)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Take notes, 4. Complete the question on the bottom of the worksheet, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #mynotes

Imagine if you knew the secret of learning whatever you wanted to learn, whenever you wanted to learn it. Wouldn't that be great. Think about all the neat things you could learn about the world around you. First, you would simply ask a question inspired by something you saw or something you wanted to know more about. Next, you would investigate, explore, or experiment to find the answer. Finally, when you felt satisfied, you would have answered your own question. You would be able to say that you've learned something. There are rules that guide learning like those that encourage safety, respecting your learning environment, monitoring time management, and recognizing when you are off task. That's where teachers can help, but with some practice you can learn how to do those things too.

Choosing to improve yourself often means that you will employ the help of your greatest ally, yourself. It also means you might be facing your greatest adversary which is also yourself. In this TedTalk by Robert Greene, learn about the power of honesty, introspection, and reflection as you contemplate the process of self-improvement.

Begin by downloading and printing or making your own version of the note-taking form below. As you watch the video, write down the important information you hear. Remember, you can stop the video any time you want, but practicing the skill of multi-tasking by listening and writing will probably help you later in life.


Video: The Key To Transforming Yourself

April 13: What are Pen Pals?

April 13: What are Pen Pals?

ELA Worksheet (50-90 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create one of your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video, article, and questions below, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Use the links below to learn more information about the once popular practice of having a pen pal.

Video: Pen Pals


Article: Time to Bring Back Pen Pals


Certain articles may have limited access per device.

1. How would you describe what a pen pal is to someone who has never heard the term before?

2. Define the following words using prior knowledge, how they are used in the text, or using a thesaurus/dictionary: Correspond, Heartfelt, Noteworthy, Stationary, Contemplate

3. What better describes this article an exposition designed to provide information, or an editorial designed to give an opinion? Explain your answer.

4. Inquiry: Do your best to ask five upper-level questions. Try not to ask a question that can be easily located in the text; for example, "Who wrote this article?" is not a desirable question, instead ask, "Why did Jeanne Croteau write this article?" or "Will having a pen pal have the same impact on me as it did Ms. Croteau?"

5. This article is clearly about pen pals, but what is the author's argument about why pen pals are so impactful? Use this answer as your central idea and use the answer frame to explain your logic.

6. The author explains several ways that having a pen pal positively impacted her. Explain one of those reasons by citing the text and explaining what you think it means.

7. The author implies that having unique stationary can make the pen pal experience more meaningful, why do you think she thinks that stationary can create a deeper meaning?

8. Why do you think that some people would rather not be pen pals with others?

9. Although the author makes several good arguments why having a pen pal benefitted her, create a counterargument that explains why having pen pal may not be a good idea.

10. Choose one: 1. Write short letter to a friend who you have not seen in a while. 2. Write a note to parent or teacher about why you don't want to have a pen pal.

April 10: Abby Wombach's New Goal

April 10: Abby Wombach's New Goal

ELA Worksheet (50-90 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create one of your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video, article, and questions below, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Use the links below to learn more information about Abby Wambach, one of the greatest soccer players in the history of U.S. Soccer.

Video: A Tribute to Abby Wombach


Article: Abby Wambach on Empowerment


Certain articles may have limited access per device.

1. The article doesn't appear to have a title. Suggest an appropriate 5-10 word title and explain why you chose that title.

2. Define the following words using prior knowledge, how they are used in the text, or using a thesaurus/dictionary: Grateful, Appreciative, Impassioned, Dedicated, Pioneer

3. Many readers would agree that this is an informational piece about Abby Wambach, why do you think they agree that this is an informational piece?

4. Inquiry: Do your best to ask five upper-level questions. Try not to ask a question that can be easily located in the text; for example, "What position did Abby Wambach play?" is not a desirable question, instead ask, "Why was Abby Wambach considered such a great soccer player?" or "What has changed about Abby Wambach now that she is retired?"

5. Which phrase best describes the central idea: 1) Abby Wambach was one of the greatest soccer players in the sport, 2) Abby Wambach is now fighting for gender equality in sports, 3) Abby Wambach is finding retired life frustrating. Use the answer frame to explain your choice.

6. What word would you use to describe Abby Wambach's character? Cite explain evidence from the text to support your answer.

7. What do you think Wambach meant when she said, "Abby, you were never Little Red Riding Hood; you were always the wolf." Explain your answer by citing information from the text.

8. Hope Solo, a former teammate of Wambach, said that Abby Wambach "was more than just a soccer player," what do you think she meant with this statement?

9. How do you think Wambach's mentality toward the game of soccer can be used by students who are facing situations where there schools are closed?

10. Wambach mentions several reasons why she believes male and female sports are unequal. Create a two-column chart that compares three to five specific inequalities that are mentioned in the article.

April 9: Pat Summit's Legacy

April 9: Pat Summit's Legacy

ELA Worksheet (50-90 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create one of your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video, article, and questions below, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Use the links below to learn more information about Pat Summit, one of the most winningest coaches in college basketball.

Video: Pat Sumitt, Pioneer in Women's Sports


Article: Pat Summit's Legacy


Certain articles may have limited access per device.

1. Why do you think the author used the word "empower" in the title?

2. Define the following words using prior knowledge, how they are used in the text, or using a thesaurus/dictionary: Empower, Motivation, Urgency, Standards, Eclipse

3. Does biography or history better describe this article? Cite evidence from the text to support your answer.

4. Inquiry: Do your best to ask five upper-level questions. Try not to ask a question that can be easily located in the text; for example, "Where did Pat Summit coach?" is not a desirable question, instead ask, "Why was Pat Summitt so respected in Tennessee?" or "Why is Pat Summitt considered one of the greatest coaches of all time?"

5. Which phrase best describes the central idea: 1) Pat Summit forever changed women's sports, 2) Records may be broken, but people can't be replaced, 3) Pat Summit used sports to change the world. Use the answer frame to explain your choice.

6. What word would you use to describe Pat Summitt's character? Cite explain evidence from the text to support your answer.

7. What do you think Summit meant when she said, "Well, the monkey's off my back." Explain your answer by citing information from the text.

8. Based on Summitt's records, how do you opponents felt when they played against teams she coached?

9. The author mentions several of Summit's records, which one of those records do you find most extraordinary? Explain your answer.

10. Imagine that Pat Summitt were to run for office, create a campaign poster with a slogan inspired by this article. Draw the poster and slogan that you've envisioned.

April 8: Cal Ripken Jr., Baseball's Iron Man

April 8: Cal Ripken Jr., Baseball's Iron Man

ELA Worksheet (50-90 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create one of your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video, article, and questions below, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Use the links below to learn more information about Cal Ripken Jr. who played holds the record for playing in the most consecutive baseball games in Major League Baseball. He played in 2,632 consecutive games.

Video: Baseball's Iron Man, Cal Ripken Jr.


Article: The Iron Man who saved baseball


Certain articles may have limited access per device.

1. To play in 100s or 1000s of consecutive games like Cal Ripken Jr, what do you think is most important: physical fitness, a healthy lifestyle, emotional well-being, or something else?

2. Define the following words using prior knowledge, how they are used in the text, or using a thesaurus/dictionary: Resolution, Exponential, Interruption, Exaggerate, Errant.

3. What do you think better describes this text: an exposition (to provide information- or an editorial (to give an opinion)? Explain your answer using information from the text.

4. Inquiry: Do your best to ask five upper-level questions. Try not to ask a question that can be easily located in the text; for example, "Whose record did Cal Ripken Jr. break?" is not a desirable question, instead ask, "Why did it take so long to break Lou Gehrig's record?" or "How did the typical baseball fan feel when Ripken broke Gehrig's record?"

5. Which phrase best describes the central idea: 1) Cal Ripken Jr. helped maintain the popularity of baseball, 2) It takes more than luck to set records like Cal Ripken Jr. did, 3) Cal Ripken Jr. served as a role model to several people. Use the answer frame to explain your choice.

6. According to the author, Cal Ripken Jr. was more than just a great baseball player. What author attribute(s) did Ripken possess that made him so great? Cite explain evidence from the text to support your answer.

7. Cal Ripken Jr. is nicknamed Baseball's Iron Man, what conclusions can you make about why Cal Ripken Jr. earned this nickname?

8. The author mentions several ways that Cal Ripken Jr. was viewed by opposing pitchers, how do you think you would feel if you had to pitch against Cal Ripken Jr.?

9. Cal Ripken Jr. serves as a model for patience, persistence, and perseverance. What advice do you think Cal Ripken Jr. would give someone about how to be successful who is in an area where schools have been closed?

10. There are several role models, like Cal Ripken Jr., who can teach us how to be successful in extraordinary circumstance. Research and write a paragraph about another role model that you think can teach us a valuable lesson about how to succeed where schools have been closed. Provide at least three reasons to support your nomination.

April 7: Independent Reading

April 7: Independent Reading

Art-Focus (50-60 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video and article, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Several studies suggest that reading 20 minutes a day will lead to interactions about 1.8 million words per year by the sixth grade and lead to higher literacy rates for those who make it a habit to read. Thinking about what you read is one way you can combine the power of your mind with the effort of your reading. This art-focused independent reading worksheet will help you think about what you read.

This article is supported by a quick video that provides information about learning during the home-based learning due to concerns about COVID-19.

Video: Advice for Learning during COVID-19


Opinion: Transitioning to Home-Based Learning


April 6: Rebirth of New Orleans

April 6: Rebirth of New Orleans

ELA Worksheet (50-90 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create one of your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video, article, and questions below, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Use the links below to learn more information about Steve Gleason, a blocked punt and the rebirth of New Orleans:

Video: The Rebirth of New Orleans


Article: The Rebirth of NOLA


Certain articles may have limited access per device.

1. How do you think the effects of COVID-19 relates to the idea of a new normal?

2. Define the following words using prior knowledge, how they are used in the text, or using a thesaurus/dictionary: Resettled, Rebuilding, Resilience, Triumph, Normal

3. Some people argue that this style of writing is informational (to give information) while others argue that it is narrative (to tell a story). In your opinion, is this article informational or narrative? Explain your answer.

4. Inquiry: Do your best to ask five upper-level questions. Try not to ask a question that can be easily located in the text; for example, "Who blocked the Falcons punt?" is not a desirable question, instead ask, "Why was this game so important to New Orleans and the nation?" or "Why does the writer say Steve Gleason is resilient?"

5. The title implies that central idea is that creating new norms can feel good. Use the answer frame to explain why the central idea you chose is the best answer.

6. The author implies that Hurricane Katrina had a devastating effect on New Orleans, cite and explain evidence from the text that supports the author's observation.

7. The accompanying video implies that the entire nation had interest in the Atlanta vs. New Orleans game, why do you think this block punt meant so much to so many people?

8. If you were in the Superdome as a Saints fan on the night of Gleason's blocked punt, what word do you think you would use to describe this blocked punt?

9. The author compares Hurricane Katrina in 2006 to the COVID-19 in 2020, do you think this is a good comparison? Explain your answer by comparing what you read in the article and what you see today?

10. There have been many stories of individuals and groups (like nurses, grocery store clerks, delivery drivers, and more) who have acted heroically during the current COVID-19 pandemic, sketch a statue, an award, or some other piece of art to show who you think should be recognized as a hero.

April 3: Listening Notes

April 3: Listening Notes

Note-Taking Form (Video + 20 min)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Take notes, 4. Complete the question on the bottom of the worksheet, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #mynotes

Imagine if you knew the secret of learning whatever you wanted to learn, whenever you wanted to learn it. Wouldn't that be great. Think about all the neat things you could learn about the world around you. First, you would simply ask a question inspired by something you saw or something you wanted to know more about. Next, you would investigate, explore, or experiment to find the answer. Finally, when you felt satisfied, you would have answered your own question. You would be able to say that you've learned something. There are rules that guide learning like those that encourage safety, respecting your learning environment, monitoring time management, and recognizing when you are off task. That's where teachers can help, but with some practice you can learn how to do those things too.

Speaker Daniel Pink presented challenges that are self-created by if/then ways of thinking. He encouraged viewers to think about problems in a way where we don't restrict our ways of thinking and begin to think about how we can create our own systems of rewards to achieve goals. How does Pink's discussion relate to the idea of learning in new places and in new ways?

Begin by downloading and printing or making your own version of the note-taking form below. As you watch the video, write down the important information you hear. Remember, you can stop the video any time you want, but practicing the skill of multi-tasking by listening and writing will probably help you later in life.


Video: the Puzzle of Motivation

April 2: War with COVID-19?

April 2: War with COVID-19?

ELA Worksheet (50-90 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video, article, and questions below, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Use the links below to learn more information about the concept of war with COVID-19:

Video: War on COVID-19


Link: American Industry Declares War on COVID-19


1. Engagement: Besides people getting sick with lung infections, explain one other way that you have observed COVID-19 impacting your world.

2. Vocabulary - Define the following words: Mobilize, Arsenal, Ventilator, Capacity, Intensive

3. This text is an informational text, explain how one of the following makes it informational: Statistics, Quotes, Specific Details.

4. Ask five upper-level questions, try not to ask questions that have one answer like, "What is a ventilator?" instead ask a question with several possible answers like, "Why are ventilators important?" or "How do companies feel about having to make ventilators?"

5. Use the answer frame to explain how the author approaches the central idea that the US is at war with COVID-19.

6. The article mentions several ways the US is preparing to wage a war against COVID-19, explain one way the US is waging war against COVID-19. Support your answer with evidence from the text.

7. Explain one inference you can make about American culture based on the information in this article. Use evidence from the text to support your answer.

8. How do you think it feels to be an employee who is producing ventilators or other medical supplies for a company like Ford, GE, or Lind? Explain your answer.

9. In your opinion, is war an appropriate analogy to describe how the United States is challenged by COVID-19?

10. Encouraged: Create a two-column compare/contrast chart (with Ireland on one side and Rome on the other) and list the different types of food from the cuisine of each culture.

April 1: Novel Reading

April 1: Novel Reading

Double Entry Journal (Until Finished)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Read your chapter(s), 3. Complete the worksheet using your chapter(s), 4. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Find a book that you get lost in. Books can inspire you to imagine, they can take your mind on literary journals around the world or to places that either do not exist or have yet to be discovered. Although you can use the linked double entry journal for any novel or chapter book that you choose, you are encouraged to discover books that are considered classics.

This week discover the character of Edmond Dantes or is he The Count of Monte Cristo? In this intriguing tale of self-improvement, spite, revenge, and forgiveness, an extraordinary transformation takes place. Just as the trap is about to be sprung, one character realizes that the only thing stronger than hate is love. Learn a bit more about the book by watching a trailer for the movie. If the preview makes you want to read the book, you can use the link to read a free version, you can check it out from your local library, or you can access it in some other way.


Monte Cristo Trailer


The Count of Monte Cristo

March 31: Independent Reading (Flattening The Curve)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video and article, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Several studies suggest that reading 20 minutes a day will lead to interactions about 1.8 million words per year by the sixth grade and lead to higher literacy rates for those who make it a habit to read. Thinking about what you read is one way you can combine the power of your mind with the effort of your reading. This art-focused independent reading worksheet will help you think about what you read. This article is supported by a quick video that provides information about social distancing. 1. Watch the Video, 2. Read the Article, 3. Think while you read. 4. Complete the worksheet.

Video: Flattening the Curve


Article: Is the US Flattening the Curve?


March 30: Facts About The Flying Tigers

March 30: Facts About The Flying Tigers

Reading Analysis Activity (50-90 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create one of your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video, article, and questions below, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Use the links below to learn more information about the Flying Tigers.

Link: The Flying Tigers


Link: The Flying Tigers Article


1. Why do you think a person would choose to go to war if their country was not involved in the war?

2. Define the following words using prior knowledge, how they are used in the text, or using a thesaurus/dictionary: Volunteer, Heroic, Resonate, Icon, Incredible

3. Which phrase best describes how the author organized this text: Chronology, List, or Cause and Effect? Explain your answer using details from the text.

4. Inquiry: Do your best to ask five upper-level questions. Try not to ask a question that can be easily located in the text; for example, "Who did the Flying Tigers fight for?" is not a desirable question, instead ask, "Why did China recruit American aviators to fight for them?" or "How might have World War II been different if the Flying Tigers were not successful?"

5. Is the central idea Unusual Facts about the Flying tigers or How the Flying Tigers helped win World War II? Use the answer frame to explain why the central idea you chose is the best answer.

6. The author seems to imply that the Flying Tigers achieved more than they should have been expected. Cite and explain text from the article that adds strength to this argument.

7. If you were to advise Claire Chenault to look for one characteristic in the aviators that flew for the Flying Tigers what characteristic would you argue? Explain your answer.

8. Why do you think that some people do not view the Flying Tigers as heroes?

9. What is the most interesting fact that you learned about the Flying Tigers by reading this article? Explain your choice.

10. If you had to choose a name for the current challenges that many Americans are facing by self or mandatory quarantine, what name would you choose? Choose a name and either describe or create a logo.

March 27: In The Year 2889

March 27: In The Year 2889

Literary Elements Worksheet (50-70 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Read a story, 3. Complete the worksheet using your story, 4. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Emerging and confident readers should regularly choose their own reading materials. Non-fiction is good to learn new information and activate analytical thinking, fiction can be used to activate imagination and impact your emotions, feelings, and critical thinking. You are encouraged to choose your own chapter books or short stories to complete literary analysis. Using the provided worksheet or your own approach based on the worksheet, read the short story, think about while you read, and then complete the activities.

The featured short story for this week is "In The Year 2889" by science fiction writer Jules Verne. Although the story was originally published in 1889, Verne showed his creative genius by predicting things like videophones, solar and wind energy, and some people even believe the Internet. Despite all of the inventions that Verne envisions, it's the one thing that man has yet to master that ultimately leads to the demise of the protagonist. Learn more about science fiction by watching the video, then read the story.


Evolution of Science Fiction


Short Story: In The Year 2889

March 26: Sir Isaac Newton's Quarantine

March 26: Sir Isaac Newton's Quarantine

Reading Analysis Activity (50-90 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create one of your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video, article, and questions below, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Use the links below to learn more information about Sir Isaac Newton and his work during a quarantine:

Link: Biography of Isaac Newton


Link: How Isaac Newton Changed the World


1. How do you think that spending time in quarantine contributed to the great works of people like Isaac Newton, William Shakespeare, and Giovanni Boccacio?

2. Define the following words using prior knowledge, how they are used in the text, or using a thesaurus/dictionary: Influential, Theory, Discovery, Apply, Concept

3. Which would you choose as an alternate title for this text: Newton's Discoveries During Quarantine, Newton: A Genius in Isolation, The Irony of How Newton Theorized Space, or something else? Explain.

4. Inquiry: Do your best to ask five upper-level questions. Try not to ask a question that can be easily located in the text; for example, "What is the name of the college where Newton studied?" is not a desirable question, instead ask, "How did studying at Cambridge impact Newton's theories?" or "Do you think we would travel to space without Newton's discoveries?"

5. Use the answer frame to explain which one of these phrases best captures the main idea of the article: Newton is one of science's greatest thinkers, Newton proved that focus overcomes isolation, or Newton did not know how significant his findings were.

6. The article states that Newton made several discoveries, which discovery do you think was his greatest? Use information from the text to support your answer.

7. What inference can you make about the work-ethic of Sir Isaac Newton? Support your answer with information from the provided sources.

8. If you were a later astronomer like Edmond Halley, how do you think you would feel about Sir Isaac Newton? Explain.

9. Why do you think that many people view courses like physics and calculus are viewed as highly prestigious courses for high school students?

10. Whether you are in self-imposed isolation, mandated quarantine, or none of the above, write a note to your future self about what you hope to accomplish over the next few weeks.

March 25: What are Hospital Ships?

March 25: What are Hospital Ships?

Reading Analysis Activity (50-90 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create one of your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video, article, and questions below, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Use the links below to learn more information about United States Navy Hospital Ships.

Link: Life on a Hospital Ship


Link: Everything You Need to Know About Hospital Ships


1. The names of the two United States Navy Hospital Ships are Mercy and Comfort, if they were to build a third one, what do you think it should be called? Explain your answer.

2. Define the following words using prior knowledge, how they are used in the text, or using a thesaurus/dictionary: Convert, Capacity, Infectious, Specialize, Unique

3. This is an informational text. How do the subheadings help the writer to maintain an informational approach?

4. Inquiry: Do your best to ask five upper-level questions. Try not to ask a question that can be easily located in the text; for example, "What are the names of the US Navy hospital ships?" is not a desirable question, instead ask, "Why are the USNS Hospital Ships named Comfort and Mercy?" or "Do you think the US Navy needs hospital ships?"

5. Use the answer frame to explain why the central idea is the purpose of hospital ships.

6. If the hospital ships are not directly helping with Corona Virus treatment, then why are they being deployed? Explain at least one reason they are deployed, support your answer with a citation from the article.

7. What can you assume about the medical personnel and sailors who work aboard naval hospital ships? Explain your answer by including specific examples from the video and/or text.

8. The article indicates that some people are concerned that hospital ships will do more harm than good, why do you think some people feel this way?

9. Do you feel that deploying the hospital ships for relief in Los Angeles and New York is a necessary move or something done to provide a sense of ease?

10. Create a T-Chart that compares the positives and negatives of sending the USNS Mercy and USNS Comfort to Los Angeles and New York for COVID-19 relief.

March 24: Independent Reading

March 24: Independent Reading

Art-Focus (50-60 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video and article, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Several studies suggest that reading 20 minutes a day will lead to interactions about 1.8 million words per year by the sixth grade and lead to higher literacy rates for those who make it a habit to read. Thinking about what you read is one way you can combine the power of your mind with the effort of your reading. This art-focused independent reading worksheet will help you think about what you read. This article is supported by a quick video that provides information about social distancing. 1. Watch the Video, 2. Read the Article, 3. Think while you read. 4. Complete the worksheet.

Video: Social Distancing


Article: Social Distancing


March 23: Listening Notes

March 23: Listening Notes

Note-Taking Form (Video + 20 min)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Take notes, 4. Complete the question on the bottom of the worksheet, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #mynotes

Imagine if you knew the secret of learning whatever you wanted to learn, whenever you wanted to learn it. Wouldn't that be great. Think about all the neat things you could learn about the world around you. First, you would simply ask a question inspired by something you saw or something you wanted to know more about. Next, you would investigate, explore, or experiment to find the answer. Finally, when you felt satisfied, you would have answered your own question. You would be able to say that you've learned something. There are rules that guide learning like those that encourage safety, respecting your learning environment, monitoring time management, and recognizing when you are off task. That's where teachers can help, but with some practice you can learn how to do those things too.

To learn more about the process of learning and examine how you can more effectively teach yourself things you'd like to learn, watch the TedTalk below by Jonathan Levi. Levi is a speed reader and memory expert who explains his journey from accepting failure to becoming a super learner.

Begin by downloading and printing or making your own version of the note-taking form below. As you watch the video, write down the important information you hear. Remember, you can stop the video any time you want, but practicing the skill of multi-tasking by listening and writing will probably help you later in life.


Video: How to Learn

March 20: Novel Reading

March 20: Novel Reading

Double Entry Journal (Until Finished)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Read your chapter(s), 3. Complete the worksheet using your chapter(s), 4. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Find a book that you get lost in. Books can inspire you to imagine, they can take your mind on literary journals around the world or to places that either do not exist or have yet to be discovered. Although you can use the linked double entry journal for any novel or chapter book that you choose, you are encouraged to discover books that are considered classics.

This week discover the world of Oz through the eyes of the Kansas farmgirl Dorothy. Dorothy and her dog Toto along with her friends the Cowardly Lion, the Scarecrow, and The Tinman journey through Oz all in search of something they are missing. In their effort to find the way home, they find friendship and face challenges and dangers that relate to nearly all of us. Although hardcopies of the Wizard of Oz can be obtained from places where books are available, you can discover the Wizard of Oz today by clicking the links below. First, preview the book by clicking on the trailer for the movie. If you think you'd like to journey along with Dorothy and her friends, click on the link for the book or obtain the book from your local library or anywhere else where books are available.


Movie Trailer: The Wizard of Oz


Book: The Wizard of Oz

March 19: Short Story Reading

March 19: Short Story Reading

Literary Elements Worksheet (50-70 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Read a story, 3. Complete the worksheet using your story, 4. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Emerging and confident readers should regularly choose their own reading materials. Non-fiction is good to learn new information and activate analytical thinking, fiction can be used to activate imagination and impact your emotions, feelings, and critical thinking. You are encouraged to choose your own chapter books or short stories to complete literary analysis. Using the provided worksheet or your own approach based on the worksheet, read the short story, think about while you read, and then complete the activities.

The featured short story for this week is Rudyard Kipling's "How the Leopard Got His Spots." Kipling uses elements like dialect, personification, and hyperbole to explain an imaginary world in where an apex predators gained its camouflage.


Short Story Link

March 18: Independent Reading

March 18: Independent Reading

Vocabulary-Focus (50-60 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Read the article, 3. Complete the worksheet using article, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Several studies suggest that reading 20 minutes a day will lead to interactions about 1.8 million words per year by the sixth grade and lead to higher literacy rates for those who make it a habit to read. Thinking about what you read is one way you can combine the power of your mind with the effort of your reading. This vocabulary-focused independent reading worksheet will help you think about what you read. Although you are encouraged to choose your own book or text to read for independent reading, provided articles are selected because they have relevant information or tell an interesting story. For this independent reading activity: 1. Download the form or create your own copy, 2. Read the Article, 3. Think while you read. 3. Complete the worksheet.


Article: Closing Schools


March 17: St Patrick's Day

March 17: St Patrick's Day

Reading Analysis Activity (50-90 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video, article, and questions below, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Use the links below to learn more information about the St. Patrick:

Link: St. Patrick Video


Link: Feast like St. Patrick


1. Engagement: Maewyn Succat changed his name to Patrick and is better known as St. Patrick, if you could choose your own name, what name would you choose and why

2. Vocabulary - Define the following words: Feast, Cuisine, Aristocrat, Import, Influence

3. Although this is an informational text about the life of St. Patrick, why do you think some people confuse it for a narrative work that tells a story?

4. Ask five upper-level questions, try not to ask questions that have one answer like, "Where was St. Patrick born?" instead ask a question with several possible answers like, "Why do we think St. Patrick was born in Ireland?"

5. Choose one of the following as the central idea and use the remainder of the answer frame to explain your choice: Roman and Irish cuisine differed -or- St. Patrick blended two cultures.

6. The article states that Patrick was a slave and wealthy person and implies the food he ate would have reflected this. Cite line from the text that proves his status in society and explain why it shows he was rich and/or poor.

7. What inferences can you make about the Roman Empire based on the influence of St. Patrick on Ireland?

8. How do you think the original inhabitants of Ireland felt about St. Patrick as he began to settle among them?

9. Why do you think that St. Patrick's Day is often affiliated with wearing green and three-leaf clovers?

10. Encouraged: Create a two-column compare/contrast chart (with Ireland on one side and Rome on the other) and list the different types of food from the cuisine of each culture.

March 16: The Spanish Flu of 1918

March 16: The Spanish Flu of 1918

Reading Analysis Activity (50-90 minutes)

Steps to complete: 1. Download the worksheet or create one of your own, 2. Watch the video, 3. Read the article, 4. Complete the worksheet using the video, article, and questions below, 5. Share with others and if you want, post to social media #keeplearning #mymindmypower #readingtime

Use the links below to learn more information about the Spanish Flu of 1918.

Link: The Spanish Flu Video


Link: The Spanish Flu Article


1. Why do you think the creator of these activities chose to use the Spanish Flu of 1918 as the topic?

2. Define the following words using prior knowledge, how they are used in the text, or using a thesaurus/dictionary: Pandemic, Stereotypes, Symptoms, Epidemic, Remedy

3. This text is an informational text, how do the included statistics prove it to be an informational text?

4. Inquiry: Do your best to ask five upper-level questions. Try not to ask a question that can be easily located in the text; for example, "After what war did the Spanish Flu occur?" is not a desirable question, instead ask, "How did World War I contribute to the spread of the Spanish Flu?" or "If Word War I had not occurred would the Spanish Flu have spread?"

5. Use the answer frame to explain why the central idea is the causes and effects of the Spanish Flu.

6. The title indicates this was the deadliest pandemic ever, cite and explain one or more facts from the text that add strength to the title of the text.

7. What inferences can you make about medical knowledge during the early 1900s based on this article?

8. The article implies that the Spanish Flu may have led to increased racism and cultural distrust, why do you think this occurred?

9. If someone from 1918 were to time travel to 2020, how do you think they would feel about the current reactions to the Novel Corona Virus?

10. Create a graphic organizer or compare/contrast chart that explains the difference between an epidemic and pandemic.